Feature: The G E T T Y

The J. Paul Getty Trust is the world’s largest cultural and philanthropic organization dedicated to the visual arts

History (taken from www.getty.edu/about/whoweare/history)

The Getty is the legacy of the businessman and art collector J. Paul Getty, and his view that art is a civilizing influence in society. Throughout his adult life, he took greater and greater steps to make art available for the public’s education and enjoyment. In 1953, he established the J. Paul Getty Museum Trust. The following year the J. Paul Getty Museum opened in his ranch house in Malibu (today, Pacific Palisades).

Mr. Getty died in 1976, with most of his personal estate passing to the Trust in 1982. Drawing upon the vision Mr. Getty articulated in the Trust Indenture, the Trustees sought to make a greater contribution to the visual arts by expanding the Museum and its collections, and creating a range of new programs to serve the world of art. Reflecting this expanded mission, the Trust’s name was legally changed to the J. Paul Getty Trust in 1983.

Mr. Getty’s philanthropy enabled the construction of the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades and the Getty Center in Brentwood, the expansion of the collections of the Museum, and the creation of the four programs, which constitute “the Getty.”

Four Programs

The Getty is composed of four programs offering resources and expertise within research, conservation, education, and digital innovation.

The Getty Conservation Institute: “advances the practice of art and cultural heritage conservation worldwide.”

The Getty Foundation: “supports the understanding and preservation of the visual arts through strategic grant initiatives around the world.”

The J. Paul Getty Museum: “collects, presents, conserves, and interprets great works of art.”

*The Getty Research Institute: “conducts pioneering research in art history and the humanities.”

GRI Mission Statement

The Getty Research Institute is dedicated to furthering knowledge and advancing understanding of the visual arts and their various histories through its expertise, active collecting program, public programs, institutional collaborations, exhibitions, publications, digital services, and residential scholars programs. Its Research Library and Special Collections of rare materials and digital resources serve an international community of scholars and the interested public. The Institute’s activities and scholarly resources guide and sustain each other and together provide a unique environment for research, critical inquiry, and scholarly exchange.
. .

All available digital images at the Getty—that is, images in the public domain or with rights held by the Getty—can be used for any purpose. No permission is required.

What’s in Open Content?
Currently, there are over 100,000 images from the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute available through the Open Content Program, including more than 72,000 from the Research Institute’s Foto Arte Minore archive, which features photographs of the art and architecture of Italy over 30 years by German photographer and scholar Max Hutzel (1913–1988). Other images include paintings, drawings, manuscripts, photographs, antiquities, sculpture, decorative arts, artists’ sketchbooks, watercolors, rare prints from the 16th through the 18th century, and 19th-century architectural drawings of cultural landmarks. [The Getty is] adding more images as high-quality digital files become available.

Access to Open Content Images
All of the images can be found on Getty Search Gateway, and the J. Paul Getty Museum images can also be accessed on the Museum’s Collection webpages.

*The GRI is where I will be working (12/4/2017 will be my first day). So much needs to be written; consider this your introduction.

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